John scott of amwell. John Scott 2019-02-05

John scott of amwell Rating: 9,7/10 1078 reviews

JOHN SCOTT OF AMWELL (1730 — 1793)

john scott of amwell

Barclay immediately complied with, and read a few pages, chusing those parts wherein Mr. The biography was then done by , another of Johnson's circle and a translator and dramatist. He is said to have applied himself to reading about the age of seventeen, when he gave evident signs of a propensity to the study of poetry, in which he was greatly encouraged from an acquaintance which he had contracted, since his residence in the country, with Charles Frogley. A pathetic tribute is paid to his memory by our author, in his Poem of Amwell, speaking of the several losses which he had experienced in the death of friends. The Webbs also admired his Observations on the Present State of the Parochial and Vagrant Poor 1773.

Next

John Scott of Amwell : Wikis (The Full Wiki)

john scott of amwell

Barclay, on the subject of the present volume, and I will not omit the opportunity of doing further justice to his memory as a critic. He likewise communicated his performances to his friend Turner, then at London: but he was always dissuaded from too early publication, and indeed his own good sense, and cautious disposition, preserved him from that rock on which others have split — the eager desire of attracting publick notice; a natural passion indeed, but, by indulging which, many have precluded themselves from that reputation which they might otherwise have obtained. This extraordinary person, who is now living at Amwell, and deserves particular notice, was by trade a bricklayer, a person of strong parts, but without education, who had, at his leisure hours, by a diligent and solitary perusal of such books as came within his reach, greatly improved his natural taste for metrical composition. In 1767 he was married to Sarah Frogley, the daughter of his friend Charles Frogley, of whom such deserved and honourable mention has been made. Bid here dark peas or tangled vetches spread, There buckwheat's white flower faintly ting'd with red, Bid here potatoes deep green stems be born, And yellow cole th' enclosure there adorn. The Country calls us forth; blithe Summer's hand Sheds sweetest flowers, and morning's brightest smile Illumines earth and air; Maria, come! Anne Williams, a lady with whose father the Doctor had formerly lived in great intimacy: she had been many years deprived of her sight, had long resided with the Doctor, and was a woman of uncommon knowledge and goodness.

Next

Who is John Scott of Amwell?

john scott of amwell

Scott's dissenting from him, he observed, that authors would differ in opinion, and that good performances could not be too much criticised. The writer of this has frequently regretted in her the loss of a most sincere friend an zealous adviser. These were first published separately, without a name, in 1778: but it was now no time for pastoral poetry to attract curiosity, when probably the merits of Theocritus and Virgil, infused into an English muse, would have been little attended to. Wide o'er the land when locusts shall be spread, Dead all the crowds that on their numbers fed: When fairest objects fail to move desire, Of youth extinguish'd all the sprightly fire; Because the time of desolation's come, And man swift passes to his final home; And pensive mourners range about the street, And rend their garments, and their bosoms beat. Here rests The empty wain; there idle lies the plough: By Summer's hand unharness'd, here the steed, Short ease enjoying, crops the daisied lawn; Here bleats the nursling lamb, the heifer there Waits at the yard-gate lowing. It has been asserted by some, that his early poetical essays were made in consequence of a tender passion, and that love first taught him to cultivate the muses; which opinion may not only have some countenance from the smaller poems at the end of his poetical volume, but may be further strengthened from the correspondence between him and his friend Turner, during the residence of the latter in London and Devonshire. John Scott was not only a lover and cultivator of polite literature, but, though not bred to any profession, was no idle member of the community; he busied himself in many concerns that tended to the good of his neighbourhood: he knew how to blend the elegant with the useful; and such as had little predilection for the author of the Elegies, were forward enough to give their suffrages to those merits that promoted the good of general life.

Next

John Scott of Amwell

john scott of amwell

How custom consecrates to fame, That reason else would give to shame! John Scott of Amwell 1730-1783 The Drum I Hate the drum's discordant sound, Parading round, and round, and round: To thoughtless youth it pleasure yields, And lures from cities and from fields, To sell their liberties for charms Of tawdry lace, and glittering arms; And when Ambition's voice commands, To march, and fight, and fall, in foreign lands. But whatever praise is due to the harmony of Mr. O quis me gelidis sub montibus Hoemi Sistat, et ingenti ramorum protegat umbra! He passed many hours with him and Frogley; and during his absence continued to correspond with him by letter. He had no acquaintance with the French or Italian. Where, 'midst thick oaks, the subterraneous way To the arch'd grot admits a feeble ray; Where glassy pebbles pave the varied floors, And rough flint walls are deck'd with shells and ores; And silvery pearls spread o'er the roofs on high, Glimmer like faint stars in a twilight sky; From noon's fierce glare, perhaps he pleas'd retires, Indulging musings which the place inspires.

Next

Inside Scott's Grotto in Ware

john scott of amwell

The Essay on Painting is an elegant piece of versification, and shews, in the fullest light, Mr. The following lines are easy and affecting. Aside from the scholarly interest and importance of this book, Friends will read it as a delicately and significantly documented and reasoned study of the contest between the quietistic and the social ideals of eighteenth-century Quakerism in the heart of a minor poet who was deeply committed to the tradition of his faith and at the same time deeply John Scott of Amwell. The Papers of Benjamin Franklin,Whitfield J. At the time, it would have boasted an incredible view of Ware. Scott was a friend of David Barclay and one of William Blake's patrons. Of these the Amoebaean Eclogues seem to me the least happy of Mr.

Next

John Scott of Amwell

john scott of amwell

Johnson, but all may surely admire his vast intuitive knowledge, and power of reasoning; and while he never descended to the little arts of attacking others by covert satire, or implied criticism, every lover of truth ought to venerate that noble intrepidity of declaring his thoughts unbiassed by the partialities of friendship, the sanction of names, or the long influence of prescriptive authority. I Bright fleecy clouds flew scattering o'er the sky. Macheath, to see his ladies well dressed. Thro' all the scenes his rapid stroke bestow'd, Rosa's wild grace and daring spirit glow'd; In him — ah! Where gay pavilions rose upon the plain, Or azure awnings stretch'd from tree to tree, Mix'd with thick foliage, form'd a mimic sky Of grateful shade as oft in Agra's streets The silken canopy from side to side Extends to break the sun's impetuous ray, While monarchs pass beneath; there sat the Fair, A glittering train on costly carpets rang'd, A group of beauties all in youthful prime, Of various feature and of various grace! Go on, Sir, in your laudable resolution of delighting and instructing mankind; of patronising the poor; and promoting the publick weal. It has been already observed, that Scott seems very early to have had a passion for gardening: he had, for several years, particularly in the years 1765 and 1766, amused himself in laying out and embellishing with plantations a few acres of his own ground, and which, though at present nearly in the same state in which they were before he had seen any other improved spot, are thought not unworthy the attention of strangers, who come accidentally into the neighbourhood. It opens with a spirited abruptness. Scott lacked a full or satisfactory education and had only come to a knowledge of poetry through friendship with a bricklayer autodidact, whose daughter Sarah Frogley he eventually married in 1767.

Next

Poem: Amwell: A Descriptive Poem by John Scott of Amwell

john scott of amwell

Johnson, and notwithstanding the great difference of their political principles, Scott had too much love for goodness and genius, not to be highly gratified in the opportunity of cultivating a friendship with that great exemplar of human virtues, and that great veteran of human learning; while the Doctor, with a mind superior to the distinction of party, delighted with equal complacency in the amiable qualities of Scott, of whom he always spoke with feeling regard. This pamphlet, at the author's desire, I gave to the late Dr. He laments his death as depriving him of a most valuable friend, whose memory he shall ever cherish with gratitude and veneration. To thoughtless youth it pleasure yields, And lures from cities and from fields. Upon the whole, though Scott's poem will not raise in the mind of a stranger any strong idea of the place meant to be described, yet it will always be perused with delight by poetical lovers of rural imagery, and must be peculiarly pleasing to those who are familiar with the scenes so elegantly painted.

Next

John Scott

john scott of amwell

In the year 1773, our author shewed the world, that his studies were not confined to ornamental and elegant literature, but that many of his hours had been spent in such useful inquiries as might tend to the general benefit of mankind. There dwells a fond desire in human minds, When pleas'd, their pleasure to extend to those Of kindred taste; and thence the' enchanting arts Of Picture and of Song, the semblance fair Of Nature's forms produce. Slow down the tide before the sinking breeze, Albino's white sail gleam'd among the trees. The Doctor was much struck with the unaffected frankness and amiable simplicity that appeared in the conversation of my friend Scott, who was highly pleased with this interview, and expressed the warmest wishes to cultivate that acquaintance, which the Doctor and his brother seemed no less desirous to improve. How far this system might have been reduced to practice, is difficult to determine, as it will always be much easier to point out an evil, than to apply a remedy; but it should be told, for the honour of Scott's Theory, that Mr. The Webbs also admired his Observations on the Present State of the Parochial and Vagrant Poor 1773. On the great defect of words to discriminate material objects, Dr.

Next